.

.
.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Weekend reflection: Native bush in stagnant water



http://newtowndailyphoto.blogspot.com/

The water at this creek in Mt Albert was cloudy and stagnant. I was surprised that there was still reflection of the native cabbage tree.

12 comments:

Evelyn Howard said...

Hi Ann, lovely pic. The lake in mine was quite black and yucky. Maybe dirty lakes work better?

Regina said...

Nice reflections!
A blessed week.

Spiderdama said...

I like this type of reflection in water! Very nice
wish you a great week:-)

Abraham said...

Hello Ann,

Thanks for the visit and comment on my blog. It is always nice to see your name there.

I like your reflections photo.

RuneE said...

Does cabbage grow on trees?? :-)

Interesting reflection in stagnant water. It gave a somewhat gloomy effect.

Bengbeng said...

yes it does give a little gloomy effect. if the sun were brighter though, the effect might b more cheery :) pst.. pretending to talk like a expert. i cant reply yr comment on HK. Ah tuong comes n goes as he pleases n only he can reply yr comment :)

Lois said...

It's still a pretty shot!

MIKE said...

Your blog has been recommended to us as a interviewee's favorite blog!

We would like to do an interview with you about your blog for Blog
Interviewer. We'd
like to give you the opportunity to
give us some insight on the "person behind the blog."

It would just take a few minutes of your time. The interview form can
be submitted online here Submit your
interview
.

Best regards,

Mike Thomas

Carletta said...

Why do they call it a cabbage tree since cabbage doesn't grow on trees? :)

Diane AZ said...

Cabbage tree reflected in stagnant water, fascinating!

You asked about the cactus in my area. It grows naturally all over the place. Some propagate by seeds, others by pieces falling off and rooting.

Ebie said...

Cabbage tree, must be an interesting plant.

Badwater was named so because, during the old days, the water was really yucky. Death Valley is hot in the summer and could be chilly in Winter. It is also 200 feet below sea level.

James said...

I like the look of the picture and the sound of the title.