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Friday, June 30, 2017

Chia Seeds

Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala. The sixteenth-century Codex Mendoza provides evidence that it was cultivated by the Aztec in pre-Columbian times and economic historians say it may have been as important as maize as a food crop.

“chia” is the ancient Mayan word for “strength.”

Sometimes I add a teaspoon of Chia Seeds to my white coffee in the morning.

https://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-health-benefits-of-chia-seeds/ 

Image may contain: coffee cup and drink 
 Image may contain: drink

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Don't be a bully and call names

When I was in school, I had a close friend who was slightly overweight. She was teased for being fat, and it really affected her personality. She argued back which made it worse. She said she was teased even at work. Shortly after I saw her before I went abroad, she killed herself.



http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11884200


A Hamilton City councillor has come under fire for saying fat people are a hazard because they could fall on you.
Councillor Siggi Henry made the comment during a council debate about sugary drinks this week.
"It does affect a lot of things. I mean, you have a fat person falling on you, I think that would affect you, too," she reportedly said.
When asked about the comments after the meeting Henry said she knew "it wasn't right" as soon as she said it.



bookniture

I watched this on TV and thought what a great idea. Imagine folding your stool and displaying it like a book. When you have visitors, you open up your book like origami and you have a stool.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1985945130/bookniture-furniture-hidden-in-a-book



BOOK x FURNITURE = BOOKNITURE

BOOKNITURE is an extremely compact furniture. You can store it or carry it around just like a book. In just a flip, it unfolds from a book to a piece of multifunctional furniture. 
  • Easy Storage
  • Quick Setup
  • Multifunctional
  • Highly portable

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Celebrating diversity




Tonight , Mt Albert Baptist Church celebrated our Mosaic Global Cafe Night. Our survey showed there are 24 ethnic groups worshiping here. We have Malaysian Peter and Angie Seow who led in the worship with their beautiful music and song.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Triumph



https://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/


For years, the resident of this premises had many Triumph cars parked not only at his car park, his neighbour's car park, but on the roads on both sides of his residence. They were an eye sore. He was dodgy when people asked why his cars were parked there, using up parking spaces. He wasn't tinkling with them. They were just parked there.  He didn't seem to be collecting them as a hobby. Was he illegally selling them?

One day, those cars on the main road were removed.  There are still other cars. 



Temple

In the early 60s, we lived in the Government Quarters along with Malays, other Chinese dialect groups, Ibans, Eurasian and so on.
Near to the houses were a small Hindu temple . There were no windows but had louvers to admit light and air. We climbed up on the wall, my brother supporting me, and we saw some statues in gold. It was full of mystique. It looked deserted because there was nobody there.

In the garden was a deep walled in well. Some one rumored that some one had drowned in the well. The water was murky. We climbed to steal the sour lime like calamansi which we ate there and then. Then there were the gardenia flowers and buds. We stole them. The plants were high up and so we had to climb. Someone screams ghost and we went screaming home.

You see. Mum had warned us not to wander there.
For nostalgia sake, I went three years ago. The temple was gone, and the modern building replaced it.
My friend said it was the smallest temple in Malaysia.

Friday, May 19, 2017

grandma's slave


There is on internet a story on "My family's slave" by an Filipino American.

Here's an abstract of my grandma's slave from my book, From China to Borneo to Beyond.

The pronunciation of my Quang Ning dialect MUI ZUI, for a slave sounds like the sour plum, and MUI ZAI as a girl is different. I don't know what it is in other dialects.

It must have been 1900s when my grandmother brought her over to be her slave. The girl was very young. It is not sure if she grew up with Grandma, or given to her when she was married.

My father, John remembered fondly of Grandmother’s mui zai (slave) whom he called Ah Jia, (big sister.) In fact he saw her more than he saw Grandmother. Grandmother worked in the rubber garden, the mui zai took care of him and his siblings. She did all the housework. She kindly separated the rough green husk of the sweet mung bean soup, so he would have it as a smooth watery thick soup.

There was talk that the British government in Malaya and Singapore was going to pass an emancipation of slaves, and those not releasing the slaves would be punished.

To preempt this, when this mui zai was 16, a marriageable age, Grandfather Kee Seng arranged for a suitable mate and married her off. This was much to the aghast of Grandmother. Grandmother whinged that this mui zai was paid for by her parents; therefore she was her property. This mui zai was her slave for life. Grandfather Chan had no right to sell her property. But Grandfather would not have any part of this old feudal slavery system. They married her off to someone up the Rejang River.
The emancipation law was never passed and Grandfather never heard the end of Grandmother harping on and on about it.

Some of those mui zais maintained a good relationship, coming back to the family as though they were part of the family. In many cases where they had suffered abuse from their owner and hated them; they never came back to visit. Grandmother’s mui zai never came back. Some, their new family forbidden them to.

Father did meet the mui zai many years later. Father was on official duty in a school near where she was married off to. She came and was hesitant to talk to Father, now an official of the government. She wanted Father to help her grand children to get into teachers’ college. She said quietly that it wasn’t that she didn’t want to visit the Chans, it was because she was not allowed to. She had been emancipated from one family into the slavery of another. She mentioned what a good family she had grown up in, and she would rather be old and single and be a mui zai in the Chan’s home. She loved Father very much.

I wrote about my grandma's Mui Zai in my book. I also remembered my mum almost got a Mui Zai too. It was after the World War Two. My great Grand Mother didn't want my mother to work too hard. So she bought a girl slightly older than my oldest sister. My father declined and packed the girl away. My Father's rationale was at this day and age, him being a Christian should not have a Mui Zai aka slave. How could he have the conscience of having a Mui Zai who slaves away while his own daughters went to school. Ah Tai aka Great Grand Mother argued we we just pay for her in the beginning and don't have to pay her anymore. Mother said we were feeding her. We knew about this returned Mui Zai when we had to do house work. We complained and wish we still had the Mui Zai.

The prounciation of my Quang Ning dialect MUI Zai, for a slave sounds like the sour plum, and MUI ZAI as a girl is different.


My parents had 6 girls, MOI ZAI SEE (bloody useless girls) as my Bodai (maternal grandma) would call us. She said, if we were in China, I would be sold off as a slave. I was the third girl. So would all subsequent girls. She also said my Dad had a Father-in-law look. When Father paid for me to study in Canada, Bodai said my fate was very good. I could have been a slave, instead I went to university.