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Wednesday, April 11, 2012

ABC Wednesday: M for Moss

Mosses and lichens are often confused, most people call lichens moss. Physically, lichens and mosses can be difficult to distinguish. In general, mosses grow in moist dark areas and have small leaf-like structures, in addition to stems. Lichens often appear grey or pale white in appearance, while moss is usually green.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-lichen-and-moss.htmhttp://www.blogger.com/img/blank.gif

In Borneo, moss grows in moist areas.

But here in my garden, lichens grow on live trees. I went to my plum and apples trees and saw lichens, Ragged Beard Lichen
and moss. Then I saw some prehistoric mosters. cast of crickets. If you look closely, they really look like monster tanks.








This is a moss. Douglas Neckera: These are reminiscence of my childhood, in the jungles of Borneo, you find these. We often pull one "branch" out, detach a little twig, and ask ouf siblings to guess where we have attached it to.



This moss is found on the beach at Pt Chevalier. It is moist and slippery. You won't want to step on it because chances are you will fall.

Botanically, mosses are bryophytes, or non-vascular plants. They differ from 'higher' plants by not having internal water-bearing vessels or veins, and no flowers and therefore no fruits, cones or seeds. They are small (a few centimeters tall) and herbaceous (nonwoody) and absorb water and nutrients through their leaves. Mosses have stems which may be simple or branched and upright or lax, simple leaves that often have midribs, roots (rhizoids) that anchor them to their substrate, and spore-bearing capsules on long stems. They harvest sunlight to create food through photosynthesis.[3][4] Mosses do not absorb water or nutrients from their substrate through their roots, so while mosses often grow on trees, they are never parasitic on the tree.

In the process of this post, I learnt there is a difference between a lichen and a moss. But most people call them moss.


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30 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

they are very cool plants. :)

Lina Gustina said...

I'm also confused about lichen and moss. I learn a lot from your post, Ann :)

www.1sthappyfamily.com

LindyLouMac in Italy said...

Interesting lichen shots, thankyou for leaving a lovely comment on my garden post on News From Italy recently, much appreciated.

magiceye said...

interesting informative post
thanks for sharing

Cloudia said...

very ancient plants!


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Martha Z said...

A very interesting and informative post, Ann.
I photographed the heron chicks with a Canon 50D and 400mm lens.
Your comment got me wondering, what does it mean for an animal to be "in the wild"? This rookery has seven nests and is not in a zoo or other inclosure but it is in an open space corridor, about 170m wide between two shopping centers. Wild birds living the urban life. Here is a satellite image http://mapq.st/ILWBJ6

Luna Miranda said...

very informative post. i'm also confused about moss and lichens. marvelous shots, too.

M is for...

Ebie said...

Cool shots of the brown leaves, curled to look like critters!

Yes, the wildflowers are called yellow goldfields. This was taken last year, exact timing, when we had a lot of rain.

Scriptor Senex said...

That's a coincidence, Ann. I did lichens for L last week. I nearly chose Mosses for toady but just decided against it at the last minute.

Reader Wil said...

Thanks for this interesting post, Ann! I have seen so much lichen on trees in New Zealand, that I thought it amazing.
You asked me about the BBC program about abortion of babies. I am sorry, but I haven't seen that program.
You also asked if the objects in the showcases in the synagogue were gold or gold plated. I really don't know, as they were not to be touched. They were behind glass and not for sale.
Have a great week, Ann!
Wil, ABC Team.

Sandra said...

love the moss and lichens. the flower today is dwarf poinciana tree.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Great photos Ann....yes, I agree those crickets DO look like some prehistoric creatures...from something Science Fiction.

BOTTOMS UP is my Wednesday post link.

Have a glorious day!

Strawberry Jam Anne said...

I found this so interesting and your photos are lovely.

Roger Owen Green said...

must say that moss and lichen differentiation s not my strength
ROG, ABC Wednesday team

chubskulit said...

Luscious.

Little MISSES
Rose, ABC Wednesday Team

Leovi said...

Wonderful photos, I love the lichens, I've always drawn.

LindyLouMac in Italy said...

Calling by to answer your question about the chocolate egg, as you have no reply set. It is not really that big Ann and I have a tiny piece as a treat every day so it will last me awhile!

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Interesting post, Ann... You could add another word in there, ALGAE... That's seaweed, etc....

We have alot of both that lovely green moss and lichens in our area... I hope people will know the difference in the two...

Great post.
Hugs,
Betsy

NixBlog said...

Beautiful photos, Ann. I love mosses and lichens and they make great photographic subjects.

NatureFootstep said...

great shots. We have, I think, the same ones up here. :)

Gordon said...

An informative post; we saw lots of mosses recently in rain forests in Victoria.

photowannabe said...

Fascinating and informative post Ann. Love your cast of crickets too.

Al said...

Nice green shots. We don't get much moss around here, it's too dry.

zongrik said...

interesting lesson

messy little girl

Ginny said...

I did not know the difference. These are strangely odd but lovely pictures, all different varieties of them!

Wanda said...

How very intersting the different mosses.

Enjoyed your comment on my Apron post, and your story of you and your sister.

I wear rubber gloves most of the time. I'm trying to respond to comments in my comment area. So check back from time to time if you visit me.

Leslie: said...

Hi Ann, all I know is you put moss in hanging baskets before the dirt and plants! lol Great post and very informative.

Leslie
abcw team

Felisol said...

In Norway we have something called reindeer lichen.
It.s bright and similar to your lichen, but it's thicker and the reindeer living on the mountain plateaus dig them out from under the snow and such survive the winter.
It's growing in the lowlands too. I often gather some in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer. By Christmastime I have fresh lichen for my decorations and wreaths. In short time the lichen then will become hard and crumble away.

Meryl Jaffe, PhD said...

Great "M" post. As a city girl I have little experience, except for hiking and slipping on the green, slippery moss! (Now I know what it is (LOL).

Carver said...

I love moss and I enjoyed your shots and information. Carver, ABC-W Team