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Friday, November 27, 2015

Photo hunt: Pets

The PhotoHunt for today is Pets.

My daughter dogsits this dog, now she is in the Solomon Islands, she wonders if the dog misses her.


http://whistlestopphotohunt.blogspot.co.nz/

Monday, November 23, 2015

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Make a Difference this Christmas at Farmers for Hospice NZ




Decorating Christmas trees is a nostalgic thing for my family. Dad started the tradition with streamers and baubles. As I accumulate more and more ornaments, I decided I would buy one ornament a year. What is more meaningful than buying an ornament that has a good cause. This is why I am all for the Farmers Hospice Bauble.

Designed by Kiwi artists Michel Tuffery and Letitia Lam, the limited edition glass baubles are delicately handpainted and feature two unique designs that showcase native New Zealand flowers.

Paki Paki to Farmers:
“We are proud to tell our customers that when they purchase Hospice Baubles, the full amount is donated to Hospice New Zealand, to support their services to remain free of charge in our community.”


Exclusive to Farmers, Hospice Baubles are sold in-store only (RRP $10) and are available from now until December 24, 2015.

Make a Difference this Christmas at Farmers for Hospice NZ

By Fleur Revell
18 November 2015
Twinkling fairy lights, lush wreaths placed at the front door and a beautifully dressed Christmas tree – the festive season is the prettiest time of year, so deck the halls with good vibes and decorate for a cause this Christmas with Farmers Hospice Baubles.

A charitable initiative from leading department store Farmers, all proceeds raised from the sale of Hospice Baubles are donated to Hospice New Zealand. Designed by Kiwi artists Michel Tuffery and Letitia Lam, the limited edition glass baubles are delicately handpainted and feature two unique designs that showcase native New Zealand flowers.

Pohutukawa by Michel Tuffery symbolises the quintessential Kiwi Christmas. Inspired by the iconic Pohutukawa tree, Tuffery’s design features traditional Christmas colours and an abundance of holly. Tivaevae – a vibrant design renowned throughout the Pacific – is also reflected in Tuffery’s artwork.

Kowhai by Letitia Lam features the official flower of Hospice New Zealand and embodies the concept of being looked after – the essence of the service Hospice New Zealand provides and illustrated by the iconic beauty of the yellow Kowhai flower.

Farmers CEO and managing director Rod McDermott says the company is delighted to be partnering with Hospice on such a worthy initiative for Christmas shoppers.

“Farmers immediately sought out two talented and unique Kiwi artists to work with in developing an authentic design for the Hospice Baubles initiative,” he says.

“It was really important to us that the artists we worked with reflected our community – and the community within which Hospice works,” says Mc Dermott.

“We are proud to tell our customers that when they purchase Hospice Baubles, the full amount is donated to Hospice New Zealand, to support their services to remain free of charge in our community.”

Exclusive to Farmers, Hospice Baubles are sold in-store only (RRP $10) and are available from now until December 24, 2015. 

  Download Media Files



For more information contact:
Mark Devlin mark@impactpr.co.nz
+64 21 509 060
Fleur Revell fleur@impactpr.co.nz
+64 21 509 600

Written on behalf of Farmers by Impact PR
By Fleur Revell
18 November 2015

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Alphabe-Thursday letter Z






This photo was taken in the Singapore Zoo. 

Yesterday, our Auckland orangeutan was sent to USA for breeding.
Auckland zoo is sending three Bornean orangutans to the United States to take part in an international breeding programme for the endangered ape.




http://jennymatlock.blogspot.co.nz/


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Monday, November 9, 2015

Thursday Challenge Treats





http://www.spunwithtears.com

"TREATS" (Candy, Chocolate Bar, Cake, Pie, Ice Cream, Comfort Food,...)

Sunday, November 8, 2015

yellow sky diving





You may say New Zealand has a lot of dare devils. My daughter G who bungy jumped at sixteen went sky diving in Taupo two weeks ago.
I wonder why they painted the plane like a wide mouth shark? Was it to make the divers feel more invinsible? That they entered the belly of the yellow shark and jumped out alive.

http://mondaymellowyellows.blogspot.com.au/


  
Stay mellow with yellow!


Alphabe-Thursday letter Y for young






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Friday, November 6, 2015

Photohunt: Obscure

Tu was given the prestigious Lasker DeBakey clinical medical research award in 2011.

An obscure Chinese woman researcher finds a cure for Malaria from an obscure herb,
 sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua) – or in Chinese qinghao – being used to treat malaria.



Amid all the madness Tu Youyou, then a researcher at the Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, was handed a daunting mission: to find a drug that would cure malaria.



“The work was the top priority so I was certainly willing to sacrifice my personal life,” the famously understated scientist later recalled.
On Monday, nearly half a century after her life-changing quest began, Tu was awarded the Nobel prize in medicine for her role in creating a drug that helped slash malaria mortality rates in Africa and Asia, saving millions of lives.

Yet for all her achievements, Tu, who is now 84, remains a little known figure, even in her native China where she had drifted into obscurity despite the magnitude of her discovery.

http://whistlestopphotohunt.blogspot.co.nz/

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Alphabe-Thursday letter X for xylogenous



This is a tree that is dead, and is host to a fungi, the wood fungus.

xylogenous means growing on wood, so I take it that the Chinese Ear Fungi is xylogenous.

I went for a walk to a park next to Mt Albert Grammar school. I came across this tree stump which has some Chinese Ear Fungi growing. I have never been here, so I walked rather slowly and clicked as I went along.

This fungi is eaten by the Chinese and has a rubbery texture. You can buy them in dry form, soak it to reconstitute and it expands about 5 times its size. Not many people like it as it feels slimy and rubbery. I used to pick them when I was a child in Borneo.

I remember reading how this Chinese man made his fortune in New Zealand by shipping them to China. The Kiwis, Pakehas and Maoris laughed at this China man, but he had the last laugh. He laughed all the way to the bank.

So now, I will be keenly looking at tree stumps and hope to make my millions.

Wood ear fungus

The first commercial sale of edible fungi in New Zealand was in the 1870s, when Taranaki merchant Chew Chong sent bags of dried wood-ear fungus (Auricularia cornea) to his homeland, China. The fungus was in demand for the crunchy, chewy texture it added to food.



http://jennymatlock.blogspot.co.nz/


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